Trials and Triumphs: UMass Dartmouth 1960 - 2006 Oral History Project

The UMass Dartmouth history project began when retired history professor Fred Gifun was asked to research and write a history of UMass Dartmouth from the formation of SMTI (Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institution) in 1960 through the 40th anniversary year, 2006.  The result of this effort was the publication of UMass Dartmouth 1960-2006: Trials and Triumph, printed by Reynolds-DeWalt in New Bedford, MA in 2006.   Prof. Gifun, with the assistance of several graduate students, interviewed over 100 individuals as background research.  He also used the Archives and Special Collections extensively. 

The collection of oral history interviews and the research files that accompanied them, are now preserved by the Claire T. Carney Library Archives and Special Collection and cataloged as a group as collection number URC 76, entitled “UMass Dartmouth 1960-2006: trials and triumph” oral history interviews and research files.

Each interview was recorded with a digital recorder and available by request from the Archives and Special Collections staff. Many of them are available online, through our Digital Archives site, or through the links provided below.  The audio is automatically streamed from SoundCloud, a streaming media site.  

UMass Dartmouth 1960-2006:  Trials and Triumph, by Fred Gifun is available to borrow from  the Claire T. Carney Library (LD3234.M28 G4 2007).

The following is a list of interviewees.  If there is an active link, the audio recording is available online.

Faculty

John Cipollini

John F. Cipollini taught history at Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, which became Southeastern Massachusetts University, from 1966-1971. He talks about his education growing up in Fall River, Massachusetts, and how he came to teach at SMTI, now UMass Dartmouth. He discusses the controversy over the tenure of SMU President Joseph L. Driscoll, and his dismissal in 1971.

Dave Creamer

Mechanical engineering professor David Creamer talks about growing up in Fall River and his education, including Bradford Durfee College of Technology, from which he graduated in 1958. He also discusses his years of teaching at Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, from 1964 to 1996. He discusses the evolution of engineering education and the various sub-disciplines, electrical, mechanical, and civil engineering, their relation to the fine arts and the field of textile engineering, and the friction that resulted from faculty with different levels of higher education. He also talks about the establishment of Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute and its relation to the predecessor colleges.

John Fitzgerald

John J. Fitzgerald taught philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth from 1966 to 1994. He served as chair of the Faculty Senate, and later as president of the Faculty Federation from 1973-1976. He talks about the circumstances of being hired and the working conditions at UMass Dartmouth's predecessor school, Southeastern Massachusetts Technological (later, Southeastern Massachusetts University), which was a new institution in 1966. He discusses the beginnings of the Faculty Federation and the Faculty Senate, and the evolution of the Philosophy Department and philosophy major. Before coming to SMTI, Fitzgerald taught philosophy at the University of Notre Dame.

Vern Ingraham

Vernon Ingraham taught English literature at UMass Dartmouth from 1965-1986. He talks about how he came to UMass Dartmouth, then Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, and the development of the English Department and the College of Arts and Sciences. He also talks about the first president of SMTI, Joseph Driscoll, and his management style.

Tom Puryear

Thomas W. Puryear served as a professor of Art History at Southeastern Massachusetts University, and then UMass Dartmouth from 1970 to his retirement. In this interview he talks about why he came to UMass Dartmouth, his impressions of the culture of the campus in the 1970s, the development of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, and the importance of the faculty union, among other topics. He speaks at length about the campus architecture, designed by Paul Rudolph, and about community projects he was involved in to preserve the historical character of County Street in downtown New Bedford. He talks about the Citizens to Save County Street and New Bedford Preservation Society and their relationship to WHALE, the Waterfront Historic Area League. The interview was conducted by Fred Gifun for the research project: "UMass Dartmouth at 40," which culminated in the publication of the campus history entitled: UMass Dartmouth 1960-2006: Trials and Triumph by Frederick Gifun (2006).

Richard Reis

Retired English professor Richard Reis talks about his education, early teaching positions, and what led him to Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (SMTI) in 1965, now UMass Dartmouth. He talks about the early years of the English Department, which he was instrumental in developing with colleagues Vernon Ingraham, Charles White, and William Nicolet, who joined the faculty soon after he did. He talks about the free-speech controversy with SMTI president Joseph P. Driscoll, who threatened to fire him along with other colleagues. He also talks about the beginnings of the faculty union by Tommy John and its relationship to the AAUP. Prof. Reis wrote a self-published memoir of the Driscoll controversy entitled "Joe Must Go" in 1997. Prof. Reis' wife Kay can also be heard in the interview.

John Russell

John Russell was employed as a physics professor at UMass Dartmouth from 1970-1999. He was hired when the university was known as Southeastern Massachusetts University, specializing in high energy physics. He talks with Fred Gifun about the evolution of the Physics Department, his colleagues, and his own emphasis on K-12 teacher training in science education. During his tenure he chaired the Academic Planning Task Force, from 1992-1995, and co-founded the Center for Teaching and Learning in 1998.

Joseph Scionti

In 1965, Dr. Joseph N. Scionti joined the faculty in the History Department at what was then Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute and would later become Southeastern Massachusetts University, and eventually UMass Dartmouth. He specialized in the Renaissance and Reformation, but also taught Western Civilization, and the history of both Italy and Germany. In this interview he talks about how he came to UMass Dartmouth, the controversial years of 1968 and 1969, the development of the Department of History, and his experience teaching.

David L. Smith

David Loeffler Smith talks about his work as dean and instructor in painting and drawing at the Swain School of Design in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Swain was a small private art school that merged with Southeastern Massachusetts University, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, in 1988. He talks about his own background and education, which included work as art instructor at Carnegie Mellon. He talks about the Swain School instructors, trustees, coursework, and ultimately, the nature of the merger. Smith also discusses the importance of training in drawing.

Howard Tinkham

Howard Tinkham taught mechanical engineering at Southeastern Massachusetts University, which later became UMass Dartmouth, from 1949-1985. He talks about his experience at the predecessor school, New Bedford Textile Institute, first as a student and then as an instructor. He then discusses the merger of the New Bedford Institute of Technology and the Bradford Durfee College of Technology into Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, which became Southeastern Massachusetts University in 1969. He discusses the architectural design of the campus in the 1960s by Paul Rudolph, and the development of the program in Engineering.

Naseer Aruri

Robert Bento

Martin Butler

Victor Caliri

Les Cory

Alden Counsel

Ron DiPippo

Willoughby (Bill) Elliott

Dan Georgianna

Harold Gilmore

Len Gonsalves

Fred Gorczyca

James Griffith

Louise Habicht

Severin Haines

Barbara Jacobskind

Gerard Koot

Ken Langley

Walt Mierzejewski

Dan Murphy

M.C. Rosenfield

Normand Sasseville

Frank Sousa

Edwin Thompson

Linus Travers

Rick Walder

Charles White

B. Zvi, John D., Wolf K. – Physics

Administration and Staff

Janet Freedman

Janet Freedman was dean of Library Services at Southeastern Massachusetts University, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth from 1978-1996. She also held a teaching position in the Education Department, and taught some of the university's first women's studies courses. In this interview, in two parts, Dr. Freedman talks about her advocacy for public service in academic libraries, and details how she developed the staff and collections at the SMU Library Communications Center, now the Claire T. Carney Library. When she began as director of the library in 1978, collections of limited depth threatened the university's accredditation which was solved by a $1 million one time grant from Governor Dukakis to the library. She talks about how this money was used for collection development, about innovative ways she increased staff, and about special programs to serve the local community, such as Project ASC, the library intern program, and the Archives and Special Collections.

Thomas Mulvey

Three audio files recorded on November 19, 2004 are 47 min., 35 min and 28 min. duration each.

Thomas Mulvey is interviewed for the "UMass Dartmouth at 40" oral history project. Hired in 1968, Thomas Mulvey served in the president's office, as registrar, in admissions, in public relations, and as dean of students when the Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute was a new institution. He was later the Vice Chancellor for Student Services/Student Affairs at Southeastern Massachusetts University, then the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and before his retirement in 2002, the Assistant Chancellor for Enrollment Management. He talks about his background, the circumstance of his being hired in 1968 by president Joseph Leo Driscoll, and working with presidents Joseph Driscoll, Donald Walker and John Brazil, Dean of Students Celestino Macedo, and with the faculty and students. Other topics include the legislation that created SMTI, the integration of liberal arts into the curriculum, and working with local politicians. He also talks about the vision of Dr. Driscoll and his choice of architectural style for the new campus.

Cathy Sullivan

Catherine Sullivan began her career at Southeastern Massachusetts University, now UMass Dartmouth, in 1971 as a secretary in the Office of Planning and Plant. She went on to work for the SMU Trustees under Cecelia Denwood, then for ten years as secretary to the SMU president, Donald Walker. After Walker left, she moved to the Office of Academic Affairs in 1986 to work under Donald Douglas, and later, in the Graduate Office under Richard Panofsky. She reflects on the early years of SMU, its development into UMass Dartmouth, and the differences in management style of various administrators.

Bob Archer

Robert Archer was the director of Television Services at the Claire T. Carney Library, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth from 1969 to his retirement in 1998. Archer came to UMass Dartmouth, then called Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, with a background in television production as Operations Manager at Channel 12 in Providence, Rhode Island. Originally part of the Department of Engineering, he was responsible for setting up television services on campus. The new studios and control room were built in the basement of the library which opened in 1972. The original intent was to broadcast programming to the campus and local educational community. He talks about broadcasting to Cape Cod Community College, Old Rochester Regional High School and other schools. The station, which originally broadcast in black and white, moved over to color around 1973. The first program produced was a noon-time news show; when cameras became smaller and more portable, the programming changed, and moved out of the studio. Archer relied on student workers throughout its history. In the early 1990s programming expanded under the leadership of Greg Stone, but at the same time fell financially under the library. Lack of resources led to it closing in 1997.

Lee Blake

Lee Blake, director of the SouthCoast Education Compact at UMass Dartmouth, talks about her education and career in teaching, government, and non-profit, and educational administration. Lee attended New Bedford High School and participated in the Upward Bound Program. She attended University of Massachusetts Amherst, and later University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, where she received her BA in 1978. She has taught at New Bedford High School and New York University. She worked for the New York Mayor's Office and Office of the Manhattan Borough in the 1980s and 1990s. Lee is president of the New Bedford Historical Society.

Jane Booth and Kathy Grandmaison

Jane Booth and Kathy Grandmaison talk about their experience working for the library at UMass Dartmouth, formerly Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute and Southeastern Massachusetts University. Jane Booth talks about her father, Robert Booth, who taught graphic design at the New Bedford Institute of Technology, one of the predecessor schools of UMass Dartmouth, from 1956-1970. Jane attended NBIT as an accounting major, and graduated as one of the first graduates of SMTI in January of 1965. She worked in Technical Services from 1965-1979, earning her masters in library science at the University of Rhode Island in 1969. Jane worked in Information Services from 1974 until her retirement in 2004. Kathy Grandmaison worked in the library as a student at Southeastern Massachusetts University, while she worked towards her BFA in Painting and Art Education, which she earned in 1974. After earning a masters in Art Education from the University of Cincinnati in 1976, she returned to the SMU Library Communication Center in 1976 part time. She was hired permanently in 1978, and then worked in the Access Services Department for over 30 years. They talk about the library being temporarily located in the LARTS building (Group I) on the 3rd floor, in the late 1960s, while the journals were still located at the NBIT campus in New Bedford. They also discuss the challenge of moving the books from New Bedford to the new library which opened on the Dartmouth campus in 1972. They go on to discuss changes in the library including the development of audiovisual services, television services and the advent of automation.

Tom Curry

Dr. Thomas J. Curry is a native of Fall River and graduate of the UMass Dartmouth predecessor school, Bradford Durfee College of Technology. After several years with the Navy in Naval Underwater Services, and in private industry, Dr. Curry returned to Southeastern Massachusetts University, which is now UMass Dartmouth, in 1983 to teach electrical and computer engineering. He went on to serve in several administrative roles at the university, including founding director of the Center for Marine Science and Technology in 1988, Dean of the College of Engineering in 1994, and Provost in 1994. In 2003 he became director of the University's ATMC, Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center. In this interview he talks about his youth, his education, teachers that have influenced him, and the various positions he has held at UMass Dartmouth. He talks at length about the formation of the Center for Marine Science and Technology and the Coastal Zone Resource Lab, and about the development of the Coop program in Engineering.

Kevin Hill

Kevin Hill served as Director of Housing, then Director of Housing and Residential Life at Southeastern Massachusetts University, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, from 1975-2002. In this interview he talks about the growth of the residential community at UMass Dartmouth and changes in the organization and management of the Office of Housing to meet the demand. He also reflects on the presidents and chancellors he has served under and their varied management styles.

William Hogan

William Hogan attended Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, which is now UMass Dartmouth, as an economics major, graduating in 1970. He returned later to teach economics and was department chair from 1981-1991, and then head of the Academic Computing Services (ACS) for 2 years. From 1994 to 2004 he was again chair of the economics department, and then dean of Arts and Sciences from 2004 to his retirement. He talks about growing up in Taunton and Dighton, the challenges of paying for college and how he came to SMTI, and the positions he has held at UMass Dartmouth. He talks about the development of the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences, and the early years of the Academic Computing Services, which merged with two other computing services (Administrative and Central) to form Computing & Information Technology Services (CITS).

Donald Howard

Donald C. Howard was appointed Dean of Men at Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (SMTI) in 1966 and then served as Associate Dean of Students, Division of Student Affairs, at SMTI, which was later SMU (Southeastern Massachusetts University) and then UMass Dartmouth, until his retirement as Associate Vice Chancellor of Alumni Relations in 2003. Howard talks about the development of the university and working with students for over forty years. Among the topics discussed is the addition of arts and sciences to the curriculum, and the establishment of the College of Arts and Sciences. He talks about how important community support, the support of the governor's office, and the support of local legislators was for the development of the university.

Joyce Passos

Joyce Passos speaks about the history and development of the College of Nursing at Southeastern Massachusetts University, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, where she was dean from 1977 to 1993. She replaced the founding dean, Sister Madeleine Clemence Vaillot in 1977, and during her tenure saw the establishment of a doctoral program in nursing education. Dr. Passos talks at length about nursing education and bachelor's programs in the United States, and the effect of changing roles of women. She also talks about the university's administrative structure over the years, and her work with various administrators, including Donald Walker, John Brazil, Joseph Deck, and Paul Fistori. A graduate of the Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, Simmons College, Boston University School of Nursing and Michigan State University, Dr. Passos also taught nursing at Simmons College, Wayne State University, Boston State College and Boston University before her appointment as dean at SMU.

Joseph Sauro

Dr. Joseph P. Sauro taught physics at Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute and Southeastern Massachusetts University, now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, from 1965 through 1993. In this interview he talks at length about his emphasis on classroom teaching and methods he found successful with students. He also served as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 1969 to 1980, and as interim dean of the College of Engineering from 1978-1980. He talks about a number of university topics including the management style of President Joseph Driscoll, the differences between research oriented faculty and those focused on classroom teaching, Faculty Senate, the formation of the faculty union, and the development of the Colleges of Engineering and Arts and Sciences. He also speaks about his work in the local community, especially his role in developing the Alfred J. Gomes Elementary School in New Bedford, Mass.

Roger Tache

Oral history interview on February 18, 2006 with Roger P. Tache, Coordinator for Administrative and Auxiliary Services at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Interview was conducted by Deirdre Gale for the "UMass Dartmouth at 40" research project conducted by Professor Frederick V. Gifun. Project resulted in a published history of UMass Dartmouth entitled: UMass Dartmouth1960-2006: Trials and Triumph, by Fred Gifun (2006). Starting his UMass Dartmouth career on February 1, 1969, Tache talks about working under SMTI Presidents Joseph Driscoll, SMU Presidents Donald Walker, John Brazil, and Joseph Deck, and Chancellors Peter Cressy and Jean MacCormack during his tenure at UMass Dartmouth.

Richard Ward

Trained as an economist, Dr. Richard Ward served as dean of the College of Business and Industry at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth from 1975-1987, when the university was known as Southeastern Massachusetts University. In this interview he talks about his background in the Navy during World War II, his education, his academic career at several different universities, and his work as an economist for government and private industry, including a time as Senior Economist and Program Director of the U.S. Aid Mission to Jordan from 1961-1963. He talks about the development of Southeastern Massachusetts University in its early days, and his tenure as dean. His priorities as dean were to achieve accreditation, develop a credentialed faculty, and develop connections with the local community.

Jim Costa

Susan Costa

Gerald Coutinho

Cecelia Denwood and A. Chekaris

Robert Dowd

James Feely and Manny Pereira

Janice Fiola

Paul Fistori

Jim Flanagan

Fran Gordon

Ginny Hadley

Mike Mahoney

Greg Stone

Paul Vigeant

Students

Byron Ford

Byron Ford attended UMass Dartmouth from 1966-1970 when the university was known as Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (SMTI) and then Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU). A political science major, Ford served on the Student Senate, and was its president from 1969-1970. He talks about why he chose SMTI, the admission process, and classes he took. Much of the discussion then centered around the controversial tenure of SMTI president Joseph Driscoll, the "flag incident" which became an issue of free speech and academic freedom, and the "Joe Must Go" movement, which ultimately resulted in the president's resignation. As a spokesman for the student body, Ford talks about the personal impact of this experience. He also speaks about his interactions with Dean of Men Donald Howard and serving on the Student Senate.

Paul Geoghegan

Paul Geoghehan talks with Fred Gifun about his experience as a student at Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU), now UMass Dartmouth, in the 1970s and the value of his education. Mr. Geoghehan was a marine science major and attended 1974-1978. He talks about why he chose SMU, his classes, the faculty, and living in the Blue House of Phase I for 4 years. He also talks about his time on the SMU Track Team, and the influence of track coach John Dowd in his choosing to attend. He notes the low teacher-to-student ratio and the accessibility of the math, biology and marine science faculty members in contrast to the experience of students at larger universities. He also mentions the Blizzard of 1978, and a short-lived proposal to host the Iranian Naval Academy at SMU. He recalls the effect of the energy crisis in 1974 and the lack of heat in lecture halls as a result.

Claudia (Robitaille) Grace

Claudia Grace graduated from Southeastern Massachusetts University, which is now UMass Dartmouth, in 1978 with a degree in Philosophy. She talks with Debra Smook for the UMass Dartmouth history project about her experience as a student in the 1970s. She talks about her father, Louis J. Robitaille, who was an instructor at the New Bedford Textile School; and then at Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute and Southeastern Massachusetts University was Director of Special Programs, and later, Dean of Continuing Education. Through him, she was exposed to the early years of the campus, when it was new, and the faculty at the time. Outside of the university, Ms. Grace was a founding member of the Women's Center in New Bedford, and Our Sisters' Place. On campus, she worked on the literary journal, Siren. She goes on to talk about her post graduate studies at Brown University, and various jobs she has held in the community, including WBSN Radio, The Cape Verdean News, Bristol Community College and Access Art, which she helped incorporate in 1994.

Mark Montigny

State Senator Mark C. Montigny, who graduated from Southeastern Massachusetts University (now UMass Dartmouth) in 1984, talks about his years as a student, including participation on the track team and political activities beginning with the "Save SMU" campaign. Montigny was active in the Student Senate and served as student trustee on the SMU board of trustees. Montigny talks about his family, growing up in New Bedford, and the importance of SMU as an affordable option for local residents.

Cathy Gleason

Brian Helgeland

June Roche

Don Solmon

Richard Stone

Trustees and Significant Others

Claire Carney

Claire T. Carney, former SMU/UMass Dartmouth trustee and library donor, was born Claire Galipeau in New Bedford, Massachusetts. In this interview, she talks about her early life, French Canadian roots, early schooling in New Bedford, married life, and work at the Morse Twist and Drill Company in the 1940s. She talks about losing her husband at age 39, her four children, and her determination to send each one to college. She later attended SMU/UMass Dartmouth herself, and graduated in 1973. In 1968 Mrs. Carney started a real estate rehabilitation business, Claremont Companies, with her eldest son, Patrick Carney. She served on the Board of Trustees for SMU (Southeastern Massachusetts University) from 1981 to 1989, and in October 2006 the Library Communication Center was renamed the Claire T. Carney Library to acknowledge her significant donation to the library. Mrs.Carney also talks about moving to Florida in 1989, her relationship with Florida Central University and work with Lifelong Learning.

M. Dukakis, Don Walker

Former Massachusetts Governor Michael S. Dukakis and former Southeastern Massachusetts University President Donald E. Walker are interviewed about the history of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Each discuss the level of state funding for higher education and the legislature's support for UMass Dartmouth in particular. UMass Dartmouth was formerly Southeastern Massachusetts University, and before that Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute. Governor Dukakis talks about his interest in Southeastern Massachusetts University in particular, emphasizing it's important to the revitalization of the region.

William and  Gabrielle Giblin

William and Gabrielle (Coyne) Giblin are both graduates of the New Bedford Institute of Technology. William Giblin received his Bachelor's of Science in Textile Engineering in 1957 and worked for many years in the textile industry, including Burlington Industries for 13 years, before joining Tweave Inc. as president and CEO in 1977. He has served as a trustee of University of Massachusetts and chair of the UMass Building Authority. Gabrielle Giblin graduated in 1958 with a degree in Textile Design and Fashion, and worked as an independent designer for many years before taking a position as an art educator in the Dartmouth Public Schools in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. The Giblins speak about their experience at New Bedford Tech, the development of the Dartmouth campus of Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, and their respective careers and family. William Giblin also talks about his father, James L. Giblin, who taught textiles at New Bedford Tech from 1938-1972, and served as head of he Textile Engineering Department. He speaks about the influence of English Department head Augustus Silva, and its positive effect on his career.

Grattan Gill

Architect Grattan Gill was hired in 1963 as the job captain on the Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute campus construction project by architectural firm Desmond and Lord of Boston, Mass. He discusses working with Paul Rudolph, who designed the overall campus plan and design, and with the firm Desmond and Lord, and the challenges of working for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He used Rudolph's designs to create working drawings, starting with the Group I (LARTS) building in 1964. He talks about Rudolph's design and intent, based on multiples and divisions of 8, and why it was necessary to use cast concrete. Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute is now the campus of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Grattan Gill studied with Frank Lloyd Wright and worked for both Rudolph and Walter Gropius of the Architects Collaborative.

David Greer

Dr. David S. Greer served as a trustee of Southeastern Massachusetts University (now UMass Dartmouth) from 1970-1981, and was chair of the board from 1973-1974. In this interview he speaks about his role on the board, his view of SMU's first president, Joseph P. Driscoll, and the development of the campus throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. He served as chair of the search and screen committee to find a replacement for Driscoll, who was Donald E. Walker, president from 1972-1983. Dr. David S. Greer was originally from Brooklyn, NY, but lived and practiced medicine in Fall River for most of his life; he died in 2014. In his career he served as the Dean of Medicine at Brown University, and was founding chair of the Departments of Medicine, the Department of Community Health, and The Gerontology Center. He was also a founding director of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985.

George Jacobs

New Bedford lawyer George Jacobs speaks about his association with the Southern New England School of Law (SNESL) and its proposed merger with the University of Massachusetts. In 2009 SNESL became the University of Massachusetts School of Law - Dartmouth. Jacobs taught business law and labor relations courses at New Bedford Institute of Technology, a predecessor school to UMass Dartmouth, in the 1960s, and was later adjunct professor at SNESL. He served as Associate Justice for the Probate and Family Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1975-1981; Superior Court, 1981-1989; and appeals Court from 1989-2003, and a number of local boards. In this interview he discusses the university's relationship with the community, the SNESL/UMass merger, and the development of UMass Dartmouth.

Robert Karam

A student at Bradford Durfee College of Technology in 1961, and later a business school graduate of Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute (SMTI) in 1967, Robert Karam talks about his experience on campus, being the first class to graduate from the new Dartmouth campus. He talks about influential faculty, including William Wild, Walter Cass, Naseer Aruri, and Sam Stone. He talks about his career in business selling insurance. He served as a trustee of SMU from 1982-1991, and chairman of the Board 1996-2000.

Donald King and son

Donald H. King talks about farming in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, which he did over a period of 40 plus years. In 1963 the state took 44 acres of his family's land for the construction of Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, now UMass Dartmouth. Born in 1915 in the carriage house on the property, Mr. King raised and sold vegetables, poultry, feed grain and milk. His son, Donald C. King taught biology, and was a counselor and then principal at Dartmouth High School from 1965 to 2003. They talk about their family history, the hardships of farming, and the land taken by the state.

Bud Lefebvre and James Chekares

Bud Lefebvre worked for Franchi Construction Inc. of Newton, Massachusetts and was in charge of the project to construct Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute, which is now University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Starting in November of 1964, the project was the largest and hardest job he ever undertook, due to the exposed aggregate and large amount of form work involved. The campus was designed by architect Paul Rudolph, and the construction project managed by Desmond and Lord of Boston, Mass. James Chekares started on the project in the spring of 1965.

William "Biff" MacLean

William "Biff" MacLean grew up in Fairhaven, Massachusetts and attended UMass Amherst for college. He talks about his experience as a representative in the Massachusetts House (1961-1981) and in the Senate (1981-1991) and his support of the development of UMass Dartmouth. He also speaks about the effort to form UMass Dartmouth Law. He also explains the naming of the William Q. MacLean Campus Center at UMass Dartmouth and reflects on the administrators and officials who have contributed to the history of UMass Dartmouth. He also talks about the importance of the School for Marine Science and his personal connection to the fishing industry.